How Tos, OpenStack

Docker Networking – SocketPlane

In the Docker Networking post I mentioned few solutions for multi-host containers connectivity. I have covered Weave in a previous blog post and on this post I’ll describe my hands-on experience with SocketPlane, the company Docker acquired on March 2015.SocketPlaneLogo

SocketPlane solution integrates VxLAN tunnels between Open vSwitch host endpoints in order to facilitate a connection between containers running on different hosts. It relies also on multicast DNS to discover other SocketPlane members in the cluster and after the discovery phase Consul is used to the actual addition of the SocketPlane member to the cluster.

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How Tos, OpenStack

Docker Networking – Weave

CONNECTING MULTI-HOST DOCKER CONTAINERS

In the Docker Networking post I mentioned few solution for multi-host Docker containers connectivity. In this blog post I’ll describe my hands-on experience with Weave.

Weave solves multi-host Docker containers connectivity by creating vRouter in each host in order to facilitate a connection between containers running on different hosts. The communicating vRouters using both TCP and UDP on port 6783. TCP to communicate topology and UDP, using a proprietary tunnelling, to forward data between the containers. On top of that, Weave installation create also a weave bridge. Each container is connected to that bridge via a veth pair and this bridge is also connected to the vRouter. It looks something like this (with an additional interface I’ll refer at the end of this post):

Weave

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How Tos, OpenStack

Docker Networking

In the previous post I went through some very basic commands using Docker. In this blog post I’ll describe some hands-on experience with Docker networking.

Docker networking has been a subject for many articles lately. There’s been few proposals of how to make things better and enable multi-host Docker containers connectivity. You can find at more about the proposals at Weave’s blog, one of the groups that has submitted a proposal. That said, Docker has acquired recently SocketPlane in order to drive its networking effort forward. Continue reading

How Tos, OpenStack

Three-Node OpenStack Juno Deployed on Public Cloud – Part 3

In part 2 of this series we have made all the required preparations for our 3 nodes and installed the Keystone and Glance services. In this last part of the series we’ll follow the required steps for Nova (compute), Neutron (network) and Horizon (GUI/dashboard) before we our OpenStack environment will be running.

Nova (Compute Service)

Nova installation requires steps done on both Controller and Compute nodes. We’ll follow the steps required on the Controller node (excluding the database related). Make sure you modify /etc/nova/nova.conf as required. To finalize installation you can save effort by using the following command in order to restart all Nova services:

cd /etc/init/; for i in $(ls nova-* | cut -d \. -f 1 | xargs); do sudo service $i restart; done

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How Tos, OpenStack

Three-Node OpenStack Juno Deployed on Public Cloud – Part 2

In part 1 of this series I described how to prepare your environment. In this blog post I’ll get into details with the installation of your Controller, Network and Compute nodes.

The following commands should executed on all nodes.

We’ll log first with the root or any other user provided by our public cloud operator and change the password to one we can easily remember

passwd root/username

Screen Shot 2015-03-15 at 7.56.15 AM

We’ll install our favourite packages. In my case vim (nano is simply cramping my style)

apt-get install vim [your favourite package to use]

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How Tos, OpenStack

Three-Node OpenStack Juno Deployed on Public Cloud – Part 1

Inspired by this blog post and the one to follow, both written by IBMer Michael J Fork, I have deployed a 3 node OpenStack environment on IBM’s SoftLayer public cloud.

Is this blog post for me?

This blog post is part 1 in a series describing in detail how to establish this deployment successfully. If you are using a different cloud provider, other Linux distribution than Ubuntu or a later/earlier OpenStack release than Juno you’ll still find this blog post helpful. This post is a complementary step-by-step instructions to the official OpenStack Juno installation guide for Ubuntu 14.04. and doesn’t meant to replace it. The exact files I have used to establish a running environment can be found on my GitHub account. My deployment is:

  • Three-node architecture with OpenStack Networking (Neutron)
  • Ubuntu Server 14.04
  • External network is defined as Flat network and Tunnel network is GRE based.
  • No Cinder is installed. Using boot images to start instances.

Now let’s get down to business! Continue reading